MODERN. GREEN. SUSTAINABLE. ARCHITECTURE.

Recognition

Recognition

“Frank Harmon has spent the past three decades fine-tuning his thoughtful, regional modernism.” – Residential Architect magazine

METAL ARCHITECTURE: “An Architect’s Insights and Instincts”

Thursday, November 20, 2014

FRANK HARMON LETS PEOPLE UNDERSTAND THE WORLD AROUND THEM.

By Mark Robins, Senior Editor

When architect Frank Harmon, FAIA, founder of Frank Harmon Architect PA, Raleigh, N.C., was in his eighth grade English class, he stared out a window and saw an interesting building across the street that captivated him. Even though his mother wanted him to be a doctor, this building and his curiosity on how it was built formed the initial inspiration for his accomplished career as a multi-award-winning architect designing environmentally responsible, modern buildings.


In the past three decades he has won more AIA North Carolina (AIA NC) design awards than any other firm in the state. In 2013, Harmon received AIA NC's Carter Williams Gold Medal, the highest honor the NC AIA chapter presents "in recognition of a distinguished career or extraordinary accomplishments as an architect." He is consistently sought out as a judge for design award juries, and his design of the AIA NC Center for Architecture & Design in Raleigh received the 2013 Metal Architecture Judges Award.


As an architect dedicated to environmental sustainability, Harmon has specified metal-from standing seam to zinc-on basically all of his projects, including arts and environmental centers, commercial and liturgical buildings, museums, research facilities and dramatic single-family homes. He embraces the fact that metal roofs reflect heat and have very long life spans, and that zinc, in particular, is one of the most sustainable building materials available.

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THE INDEPENDENT WEEKLY: “N.C. State re-zoning proponents want high-rise ‘student housing towers’ ”

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

AIA NC Center for Architecture & Design

 

By Bob Geary

Hillsborough Street is on my mind. It's Raleigh's main street, with due respect to Fayetteville Street. The latter is Raleigh's big-city hub, and we are becoming quite the city—which is great. But we're not so big that people don't nod as you pass them. We're a small town at heart and a college town. And our main street is Hillsborough Street.

So I've followed its ups and downs over the years, writing to encourage its revitalization and to discourage soulless, out-of-character development. In recent months, I've cited a pending rezoning case on Hillsborough Street as an example of the way Raleigh leaders give lip service to good land-use planning—as in the 2030 Comprehensive Plan—but don't follow through.

Today, I want to come at that rezoning case a different way. Yes, the proposal for seven-story student housing on the north side of Hillsborough Street clashes with the comprehensive plan, which calls for three-to-five story buildings max—but perhaps the plan is wrong?

By Bob Geary

Proponents of the rezoning have offered a different vision for Hillsborough Street:

A student housing village of seven-story and taller towers across from N.C. State and pushing back to Vanderbilt Avenue or even Clark Avenue. Thousands of NCSU students could walk to campus.

Before I discuss it, I want to give a nod to an upcoming series hosted by the N.C. Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (see box, this page). I'm drawn especially to the first topic, Community Engagement and Placemaking, which bears the stamp of the leadoff speaker, architect Frank Harmon.

When I asked Harmon, a brilliant designer, teacher and writer, what prompted the series, he responded immediately: "I saw another dreary set of apartments going up from my office window."

With the recession over, Raleigh can expect a growth spurt in the next five years equal to our last 20, Harmon said. "The whole point is to reach out and tell people that they can have a role in how their city grows." READ MORE...

NORTH CAROLINA HOMES: “Designing Your Own Home with an Architect: An Interview with Frank Harmon of

Monday, March 17, 2014

A peek through the garden wall at Frank Harmon's own home.

When it comes to designing your own home, the process can be strenuous, tedious, and overbearing. That is when you realize it's probably best to enlist in a professionals help, such as an architect. So we interviewed Frank Harmon of Frank Harmon Architect PA to learn more about the architects involvement in the home design process...

By Frank Harmon, FAIA

Where Should Someone Who Wants to Design Their Own Home Begin?


By going to an architect. The most important aspect of designing a home is the specific site on which it will be built. Most homeowners just don't realize that. An architect can reconcile the homeowner's needs with the specifics of the site, from hydrology and which direction it's facing to how many trees or other terrain issues will be impacted. And how the house is oriented on the site will impact its access to natural light and ventilation, desired views and undesirable views, etc... READ THE ENTIRE INTERVIEW

 

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ARCHITECTS+ARTISANS: “The Nags Head Cottages”

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

"...the finest houses in North Carolina."

Guest post by Frank Harmon, FAIA

A row of shingled cottages in Nags Head, N.C. has welcomed the rising sun over the Atlantic Ocean for more than 100 years. Samuel J. Twine, a craftsman from Elizabeth City, built or at least added onto many of them. Families from mainland North Carolina and Virginia originally came to the cottages by boat to enjoy perennial, summer-long vacations.

Countless hurricanes changed the shape of the seashore at Nags Head, and the automobile age ushered in motels, parking lots, and saltwater McMansions. But these dusky houses command a mile-long strip of frugal beauty.

I think these are the finest houses in North Carolina. They are built with local materials: juniper shingles, recycled lumber, even parts of shipwrecks. They are sturdy enough to resist hurricanes, yet light enough to welcome the sun and summer breeze...READ MORE...

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WALTER MAGAZINE: “Forms That Function”

Friday, February 28, 2014

Frank Harmon: 360 degrees

Architect Frank Harmon may have designed his own office, but it wasn’t originally meant for him. His third-floor space on East Peace Street was designed as an office for lease atop the American Institute of Architects North Carolina Center for Architecture and Design – a way to bring in revenue to help pay for the new structure.

But as the Great Recession dragged doggedly on, tenants were less than forthcoming. So Harmon, having paid off the mortgage on his office in nearby Boylan Heights, decided to lease the new space himself.

All the moving parts came together to benefit each party involved. READ MORE...

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AECCafe: “Architect Frank Harmon Receives Prestigious Gold Medal and Four Project Awards”

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Frank Harmon, FAIA

After an evening aboard the USS North Carolina, the Raleigh architect took home AIA NC’s highest honor as well as four awards for his firm’s completed projects.

September 19, 2013 (Raleigh, NC) -- After what turned out to be a very big night for his small, Raleigh-based firm, architect  Frank Harmon, FAIA, went home with the  F. Carter Williams Gold Medal, the highest honor the  North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC) bestows on an architect, as well as four other prestigious awards for projects when the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC) presented its 2013 AIA NC Design and Chapter Awards recently onboard the USS North Carolina in Wilmington. READ MORE...

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Meet 2013 AIA TN Convention Speaker Frank Harmon

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

It’s not often practical to build what one designs, but the occasional foray into the construction process has given Harmon a trust in wholesome materials and confidence that he can use them to make elegant spaces. The result is a vernacular modernism as slyly sophisticated as any found in New York

The following is an excerpt, follow this link to see the article in its entirty.  

Who is your dream client and why?
Our best clients are those who want something really passionately: a school teacher who wants a nature classroom open to the outdoors where her children can learn from what they see and hear; a church building committee that wants to bring community to its family of buildings; or a retired couple who want to live gently on the land.

Are there unique ways you engage your client in the design process?
We listen to our clients' needs and document what we have learned. For public projects we hold design workshops. For private projects we visit the clients in their homes, workplaces, or places of worship. For a recently completed $9M church renovation,for example, we observed and documented the church activities over a one-month period, presenting graphic analytical drawings that were invaluable in reaching consensus on design.

There is a current assumption that architecture graduates and young interns are not prepared when they enter the real world or the profession.

Most of our interns have little idea of the importance of the site: its topology, hydrology, geology, ecology and climate. Listening to our clients and the site is a life-long skill to practice.

There is the current topic that architecture graduates and young interns are not prepared when they enter the real world or the profession. What have been some key things about the real world and the design profession you've learned that you wished you learned early on?
There is a limit to what I can do by myself. Though I admire the Australian architect Glenn Murcutt's ability to maintain a one-man practice, I learned that I am more productive working in a team. Besides, it's more fun!

Any other advice to young architects or students or those wanting to study architecture?
My advice to any young architect is to travel: travel to see other cultures and observe how culture informs architecture and design. This may enable you to understand your own culture more clearly. Le Corbusier sewed a special pocket for a sketchbook in his trousers when he traveled as a young man. Those sketches he made formed his life. By the way, he kept a sketchbook with him for the rest of his life.

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NEWS & OBSERVER: “Architect Frank Harmon believes in learning by sketching”

Saturday, June 22, 2013

Architect Frank Harmon, 72, sketches at his downtown Raleigh firm, Frank Harmon Architect PA, Thursday May 16, 2013. Harmon believes that every building offers lessons to be learned – and that the best way to absorb them is to sketch. Photo by JULI LEONARD

On a late spring morning in 2011, a motor coach jam-packed with North Carolina architects nosed into the parking lot at Poplar Forest, Thomas Jefferson’s Palladian retreat in rural Bedford County, Va.

An entourage of 50 disembarked, to be divided into two groups. One would follow the estate’s director of archeology and landscape through the grounds surrounding the early 19th-century home. The other was to tour the interior of the house with its architectural historian. After lunch, the groups would switch tour guides.

But one individual, wearing a Panama hat and a white, short-sleeved linen shirt, elected to do neither. Instead, he quietly pulled out his sketchbook and pens, and strategically positioned himself on the lawn beneath the shade of a spreading tulip poplar. Slowly, he began to draw the contours of Jefferson’s octagonal-shaped masterpiece, a lyrical essay on light composed in deep-red brick, cream-colored mortar and limestone-plastered columns. He was working to discern the nature of the building, its site and its landscape, using the fewest number of lines possible.

His name is Frank Harmon, and he’s known to some as the unofficial dean of North Carolina architects... (READ MORE)


 

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URBAN HOME: “Triangle Stylemaker”

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

(left: current edition, Urban Home - Raleigh)

By UH staff

We asked the team of the well known Triangle architecture firm Frank Harmon Architect what some of their favorite and inspiring things are currently. True to form, this team knows what's hot. Check out their picks for inspiring style and design... READ MORE